Preparation for the Ayahuasca Experience

by Howard G Charing

Eagle’s Wing

General Information about Ayahuasca

After being virtually ignored by Western civilization for centuries, there has been a huge surge of interest in Ayahuasca recently. There is a growing belief that it is a kind of ‘medicine for our times’, giving hope to people with ‘incurable’ diseases like cancer and HIV, drug addictions and inspiring answers to the big ecological problems of modern civilization.

Spirituality is at the centre of the Ayahuasca experience. Purification and cleansing of body, mind, and spirit in a shamanic ceremony can be the beginning of a process of profound personal and spiritual discovery and transformation. This process can continue indefinitely even if one never drinks Ayahuasca again. One thing is sure, and that is that every person gets a unique experience. We believe that by seriously looking at the way Ayahuasca is used we can improve our life experience and benefit more from this medicine.

Ayahuasca is the jungle medicine of the upper Amazon. It is made from the ayahuasca vine ( Banisteriopsis Caapi) and the leaf of the Chacruna plant (Psychotria Viridis). The two make a potent medicine, which takes one into the visionary world. The vine is an inhibitor, which contains harmala and harmaline among other alkaloids, and the leaf contains vision-inducing alkaloids. As with all natural medicines, it is a mixture of many alkaloids that makes their unique properties. For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline (LSD) is synthesised in a laboratory, contrary to popular opinion, the result is not at all the same.

The oldest know object related to the use of ayahuasca is a ceremonial cup, hewn out of stone, with engraved ornamentation, which was found in the
Pastaza culture of the Ecuadorian Amazon from 500 B.C. to 50 A.D. It is deposited in the collection of the Ethnological Museum of the Central
University (Quito, Ecuador). This indicates that ayahuasca potions were known and used at least 2,500 years ago.

Ayahuasca is a name derived from two Quechua words: aya means spirit, ancestor, deceased person, and huasca means vine or rope, hence it is known as vine of the dead or vine of the soul. It is also known by many other local names including yaje, caapi, natema, pinde, daime, mihi, & dapa. It plays a central role in the spiritual, religious and cultural traditions of the Indigenous and Mestizo (mixed blood) peoples of the upper Amazon, Orinoco plains and the Pacific coast of Colombia and Ecuador.

The plants are collected from the rainforest in a sacred way and it is said that a shaman can find plentiful sources of the vine by listening for the ‘drumbeat’ that emanates from them. The mixture is prepared by cutting the vines to cookable lengths, scraping and cleaning them, pounding them into a pulp. Meanwhile the Chacruna leaves and picked and cleaned.

So what, perhaps, is the advantage of ayahuasca over other disciplines? In the words of Padrino Alex Polari de Alverga of the Santo Daime Community in Brazil, “Daime (ayahuasca) is basically a shortcut, it’s as if we had been travelling down the same highway as the rest of humanity, but then, in order to arrive at our destination more quickly we took a side road. When taking such a shortcut, however, we must be very careful and clear-minded. It is a shortcut that leads us to truth, but only if we follow in the footsteps of the Masters who have preceded us.”

Medicines like ayahuasca can help us along our path but we still have to do the work ourselves. My experience is that these kind of allies can help us open the doors of perception, but what we do when we get there is entirely our own challenge.

To understand ayahuasca in the local context, one cannot avoid taking a look at the ecological environment, such as the forest, cultural environment and indigenous cultures. This has structured the cultural content of ayahuasca.

There are many legends and myths about ayahuasca, one the more romantic is from the Shipibo people who live up the river in the heart of the jungle in the Peruvian Amazon.

This tale is centered around women, more so than men, as they look after the children and their health, whilst the men are out hunting and fishing. Men are more interested in plants that aid their inner spirits whilst hunting. Women are more interested in plants that will allow their children to grow.

There was one particular woman who was very interested in plants, who liked to pick the leaves of different plants. She would then crush the leaves into a pot and soak them in water over night. She would then take a bath every morning before sunrise (the way to find out about various plants and their effects is to bathe in them). She bathed in them every morning until she had a dream. In her dream a woman came and said, “why are you bathing every day?”

She answered, “I am doing this as I want you to teach me.” The other woman said, “You must seek out my uncle, his name is Kamarampi. I will show you where to find him”. The woman led the other woman to her uncle. The uncle showed her how to mix the leaves of the chacruna, which was a bush she had taken leaves from to bathe in. He showed her how to prepare the brew of Ayahuasca, he told her to go and tell the people the knowledge of how to use the brew. The Indigenous people past and present have taken Ayahuasca to enable them to focus on other dimensions. One example: – To enable them to be more successful on a hunting trip they would contact the Mother spirit of certain species, through the Ayahuasca. The hunt would be more successful.

One of the many mysteries surrounding Ayahuasca is how the vine became to be used with the Chacruna leaves as although they both come from the same soil but always grow apart otherwise the ayahuasca winds around the Chacruna and kills it. No one knows this but we get a clue from how the shamans interact with the plant. Javier Arevalo a shaman from the Peruvian Amazon told us “ in the old days his grandfather and uncles used to sit around after taking ayahuasca and he said that ayahuasca was originally taken alone and in the visions they saw that Chacruna was missing. Ayahuasca would say I am the doctor that gives the vision. His grandfather responded, how can we find this plant? The response in the vision was, you can find it by turning two corners. So they went around two corners and found a bush which attracted them which was Chacruna i.e. the ayahuasca showed them.

This is a fundamental principle, in the visions it is the spirit doctor of ayahuasca which tells them what is wrong with their patient, what medicine they need, or who has caused the illness or malaise.

The Icaros

Integral to the ceremony are the chants that the shaman sings. These are known as Icaros, and the chant will direct the nature of the ceremony or visionary experience for the group and for individuals as the shaman during the ceremony will chant specific Icaros for that person’s needs.

The words of the chants are symbolic stories telling of the ability of nature to heal itself. For example the crystalline waters from a stream wash the unwell person, while coloured flowers attract the hummingbirds whose delicate wings fan healing energies etc. You might see such things in your visions but the essence which cures you is perhaps more likely to be the understanding of what is happening in your life, allowing inner feelings to unblock so that bitterness and anger con change to ecstasy and love. To awaken from the ‘illusion of being alive’ is to experience life itself.

There are several different kinds of Icaros, at the beginning of the session. Their purpose is to provoke the mareacion or effects, and, in the words of Javier Arevalo, ‘to render the mind susceptible for visions to penetrate, then the curtains can open for the start of the theatre’.

Other Icaros call the spirit of Ayahuasca to open visions ‘as though exposing the optic nerve to light’. Alternatively, if the visions are too strong, the same spirit can be made to fly away in order to bring the person back to normality.

There are Icaros for calling the ‘doctors’, or plant spirits, for healing, while other Icaros call animal spirits, which protect and rid patients of spells.

Healing Icaros may be for specific conditions like manchare, which a child may suffer when it gets a fright. The spirit of a child is not so fixed in its body as that of an adult, therefore a small fall can easily cause it to fly. Manchare is a common reason for taking children to ayahuasca sessions.

Preparation for the Ayahuasca Experience

In the West there are lots of stories like ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’ reminding us that plants have spirit power, Alice in Wonderland explored this world too. There is a large body of knowledge of power plants even if the form has been adapted to fairy tales and ‘domesticated’, not to under rate the richness of Grimms’ tales.

When a person drinks Ayahuasca, especially with a trusted shaman, there is a chance to learn and trust the plant. You discover that it works in its own way. It is a great moment getting to this point. Then there is the question of whether the plant trusts us, because it can be abused and used for getting the wrong kind of personal power. Without intention, vision, preparation, and a shaman, it is a drug not a healing medicine.

A major difficulty for Westerners is the diet and the living conditions in the rainforest. There is also the care clients need afterwards, as one is extremely vulnerable after drinking Ayahuasca. Also some of our attitudes need to change, for example some people find vomiting unpleasant.

In the Ayahuasca ceremony purgative cleansing of the physical body is an essential preparation for the new level of emerging consciousness. Vomiting and occasionally brief diarrhoea are common effects during the initial sessions.

The Shaman’s Diet

An integral element of this preparation is to undertake a diet intended to reduce excessive sugar, salt, oils, pork, fat, and spicy food in the body in
preparation to be in communion with the spirit of Ayahuasca. Reduction of these should commence as soon as one commits to the experience.

Pork in particular is considered to be impure and is studiously avoided by Ayahuasca practitioners. Complete abstinence from pork and lard for at least two weeks prior to the first ceremony is recommended to participants to reduce the impact of the purge. It is also recommended that this abstinence continue for at least two weeks after the final ceremony.

In the initiatory diet for those seeking personal cleansing and healing, chicken, fish, wild game meat, fruits, and vegetables may be eaten but with little if any salt, sugar, oils or spices. The cleansing effect and strength of the visionary experience can be greatly enriched by one’s commitment to these preparations.

Sexual abstinence also forms part of the diet and is a traditional requirement of Ayahuasca cleansing and healing. We recommend abstinence from sexual activity for a few days prior to the ceremony, and to continue a day or two after the last ceremony.

As all Amazonian shamans will tell you, and in the words of Dona Cotrina
“ Sex is bad. The ‘mother plant’ loves you and if you make love to another person, you are being unfaithful to her”. For this reason it is often said that Ayahuasca is jealous, and if you do not respect her, she makes you ill instead of healing you. You will also not be able to see any visions. The ill effects from not respecting the diet are called cutipa and range from a sense of trauma and stress to skin problems.

Menstrual cycle.

This is a complex issue in the Amazonian tradition. Basically women in their menstrual cycle are not permitted by Amazonian shamans and curanderos to be present in the preparation of the brew, drink Ayahuasca or attend the ceremonies. This is an ancient tradition rooted mainly in safety considerations rather than sexism, as female shamans in the Amazon also follow these prohibitions.

Some shamans say the presence of a woman in menstrual flow prevents them from “seeing” the causes of illness among those present in the ceremony, thus obstructing their ability to make diagnoses and facilitate healing.

Although Eagle’s Wing are unable to make any exception as this rule is observed by shamans in the Ayahuasca tradition, our experience is that shamans have a degree of flexibility and can perform a special chacapa session with participants to address this.

Medical Precautions

It is important to know that, in some cases, the consumption of Ayahuasca in combination with some groups of prescription & non-prescription medicines can bear health risks.

1. Prescription Medicines
If you are taking prescription medication (including antibiotics), are subject to high blood pressure, have a heart condition, or are under treatment for any health condition), please consult your GP.

1.1 Anti-depressants
Ayahuasca (Banisteriopsis Caapi) contains MAOI’s (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) generally in the form of harmine and harmaline therefore Medical consultation is essential if you are taking Prozac or other antidepressants affecting serotonin levels, i.e. serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRI).

SSRI’s block the reuptake of serotonin in the brain and because MAOI’s inhibit breakdown of serotonin, the combination of MAOI’s and SSRI’s can lead to too high levels of serotonin in the brain. SSRI’s are much more common than MAOI’s which are found in some anti-depressants. Consult your GP about the use of temporary monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI).

These medications generally require a period of six to eight weeks to completely clear the system and must be reduced gradually.

2. Non-Prescription Medicines
Non-prescription medications such as antihistamines, dietary aids, amphetamines and derivatives, and some natural herbal medicines, i.e. those
containing ephedrine, high levels of caffeine, or other stimulants, may also cause adverse reactions. We recommend that you discontinue all such medications, drugs, and herbs for at least one week prior to and following work with Ayahuasca.

3. Recreational Drugs
Avoid all recreational drugs, in particular MDMA (Ecstasy), cocaine, heroin. Also do not drink alcohol on the day of the ceremony.

4. Herbal Remedies
Use of herbal remedies for depression such as St John’s Wort (which also influence the serotonin levels) need to be discontinued as per 2 above.

Article Source: Preparation for the Ayahuasca Experience

Comments
36 Responses to “Preparation for the Ayahuasca Experience”
  1. lisa says:

    If I completeltely stop using my Zoloft(ssri) medication one week before doing Ayahuasca, will I be safe?
    This is a huge concern for me.

  2. erik says:

    In the third paragraph it mentions mescaline (lsd). Mescaline and lsd are not related.You might want to check the facts,Its hard to take this site as legit with such a big error.

  3. Chris says:

    “For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline (LSD) is synthesised in a laboratory, contrary to popular opinion, the result is not at all the same. ”

    this particular passage is inaccurate as mescaline and lsd are 2 very different things.

  4. Joe says:

    mescaline is NOT LSD
    wtf you talkin about

  5. kettunainen says:

    For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline (LSD)

    Mescaline is mescaline. LSD is Lysergic acid diethylamide.

  6. tribble says:

    Hi there!

    I have released an video with Christian Rätsch speaking about Ayahuasca and the ritual and consumer society. It is held in german language – maybe someone can make subtitles :)

    http://psi-tv.hanfplantage.de/video-ayahuasca-ritual-und-konsumgesellschaft-mit-christian-raetsch-25-03-2009

  7. Teleterkji says:

    Mescaline is only one of the alkaloids in Peyote.
    The same with Lsd,it is only one alkaloid.
    Using synthesized mescaline may have a similar effect to eating the Peyote buttons
    But it is not entirely the same.
    Indians wouldnt use a syntesized form of mescaline in their rituals
    And i don`t think they would use Lsd-25 either.
    The voice of the logos is not the main theme in an Lsd session,in my opinion
    but is when one is inebriated by Ayahuasca or Psilocybe Mushrooms,and Peyote.
    These plants are complete universes in themselves,and i wonder if not Lsd-25 lacks the natural touch.

    Thank you for broadening my knowledge on shamanism.

  8. mammothnoise says:

    I don’t really buy too much into the synthetic vs. natural stuff other than the fact that natural entheogens are much more likely to be safe due to the long history behind their use.

    I don’t see why LSD can’t contain its own spirit. Its certainly very heavenly at times ( :

  9. Ian says:

    Concerning:

    “For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline (LSD) is synthesised in a laboratory, contrary to popular opinion, the result is not at all the same. ”

    Very interesting article. But the above is untrue. Mescaline is not related to LSD, but rather, it is it’s own molecule, N,N-Dimethylmescaline.

  10. Jed McKenna says:

    The ‘mother plant’ loves you and if you make love to another person, you are being unfaithful to her”. For this reason it is often said that Ayahuasca is jealous, and if you do not respect her, she makes you ill instead of healing you. You will also not be able to see any visions.

    -hm…. ayahuasca showed me oneness with everything….
    while I had Sex with Ayahuasca, we could even include other souls or spirits to have sex with us together, without being jealous! Because all is one, there are actually no “others”, with whom I could betray ayahuasca! Thats only stuff you find here in duality in hollywood love movies!
    With ayahuasca you see, that everybody is conected in love and ayahuasca is everybody, so no matter with whom you have sex, ayahuasca is everybody. ..plants, trees, mother earth, universe, father, mother, child, female, male, sister brother, soul, god, everything! no boundaries! pure wisdom!

    If I read things like “Ayahuasca is jealous”………….no way!………humans can be jealous, but not pure unconditional divine ayahuasca love……
    if ayahuasca is able to be jealous, than it is not unconditional love!

    which it was;)
    I love you aya<3

    ayahuasca even told me, that she is not just a plant spirit with a given name, but a representative for ALL-that-is, connected with all others, with eternity!

    even while writing this at 2′ o clock in the morning I sense some
    aphrodisiacal rose-strawberry-raspberry-like frangrance….:)

    thanks for that sign aya!

    do not even know if this smell is coming from physical somewhere or some astral nature…..how ever :D

    big thanks!

  11. Meghan says:

    Jed – I completely agree. I’m coming up on almost 200 ceremonies, and though I’ve heard over and over that traditionally “ayahuasca is jealous”, I don’t feel it. It seems to me (and I’m still a baby in my apprenticeship, so I always leave room to be wrong) that the Medicine is simply showing us higher levels as we go along…but if we have a mental construct or belief system that we are unwilling to transcend (such as traditional Amazonian lore), be it out of respect or whatever, we can’t see past it. I’ve noticed myself, as an American working with the Medicine in the Amazon, I had almost a ‘to a fault’ tendency to respect the lore and traditions so much, that it limited my understanding. Now I’m beginning to balancing out, looking past all of it to higher planes of truth. Also, as Westerners we have completely different minds and mental contructs than in the jungle – neither better or worse – just a different way of thinking. So for us to adopt everything the shamans have learned and treat it as gospel is also limiting – some of it is simply not applicable to a Western viewpoint. They’re style has also been extremely refreshing for me, pulling into a more heart-centered way of understanding (rather than trying to analyze it all!) Anyway sorry for the tangent…my point is – I agree with you! lol

    peace:)
    Meghan

  12. Zaka says:

    “For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline (LSD) is synthesised in a laboratory, contrary to popular opinion, the result is not at all the same. ”

    this particular passage is inaccurate as mescaline and lsd are 2 very different things.

    Irie, I think that this is not saying mescaline and lsd are the same thing. I think it was badly written and would make more sense if it read;
    “For example, Peyote, the cactus used by the North Native Americans, is said to contain 32 active alkaloids, so when one of those alkaloids, mescaline, is isolated & synthesised in a laboratory(LSD), contrary to popular opinion, the result is not at all the same. ”

    Respect
    Z

  13. Helena says:

    What a beautiful site…

    and though I am upcoming my 2nd only aya I had such an amazing and very lucid, profound and clear Aya the first time that I have no worries about a second…the vomiting will no doubt be funny again…

    We just have it at home, with a lamp on and a blanket each and make sure the cats are locked out and the phones off…Im meditating at nights and and am a vegetarian so keep my diet as clean as possible before (without being too carrot sticks and cabbaged out!)

    And I just wanted to say that I agree that Aya cant be jeleous.

    This is a human/animal trait, you will never see this in mother earth, it works together swappiny and flowing energy… living dying regeneration it’s all the same and egoless. I had some very sexual times during the aya it even showed my deepest fantasies and that was fun :)

    Does anyone think perhaps that it is more that jeleousy is a very latin american trait? (knowing many latino peopel in my timew and watching them fight and try to control eachother)

    Awesome posts too :)

  14. thomas gerlach says:

    question…..I’m 63 years old with a little blood pressure problems and have 2 stints in my veins from the heart.
    Although I feel that my conditioned is held at normal with Meds. I’m pretty healthy. Does this cause a problem
    on taking the Vine medicine.
    Thanks
    Tom

  15. Johnny says:

    One comment about the sexual abstinence, folks. There are physiological benefits to abstinence that may support the folklore. In folklore metaphor is used, in this case jealousy, to perhaps illustrate a more prosaic idea. In Chinese medicine and Aryuvedic medicine, abstinence, especially for men, is suggested to gather jing, or sexual power. A male orgasm releases sperm and semen which is highly concentrated with minerals. In Chinese medical folklore it is suggested that the woman actually receives the power and benefit of the male jing after ejaculation. Although there are obvious benefits to healthy sex, the male does lose a big load of zinc and magnesium. Sex, especially too much sex, has a depleting effect on the adrenal cortex and the immune system in general.

    It’s possible that this is why it is suggested to abstain. Much folklore has practical benefit if we go back far enough. But, it could all be a crock. However, I generally feel far stronger after a period of abstinence, and going into a ceremony strong is, for me, very important. I can’t speak for women, though.

    Johnny

  16. zach says:

    i’ve never done aya before but my friend gave me the engredients because she had no idea its mind altering effects (she just makes soaps and junk with herbs), I originally wanted to extract the DMT from the jeruma but now i think that if i can handle the strict diet aya might be a safer choice than dealing with dangerous chemicals.
    Does anybody have any advice?

    OH and i strongly recommend everybody to read or at least look into the book “DMT: the Spirit Molecule” by Dr. rick strassman, it will give you an extremely in depth look at what the chief chemical in aya (DMT) is all about.

  17. E says:

    Hi,

    I have recently taken ayahuasca for the first time. I have a friend who I am sure would enjoy and benefit from the experience. However this person has irritable bowel syndrome and a stomach ulcer. Because of this they are pretty scared of taking anything that might aggravate it. They are worried that the purging effect could make this very painful or even cause more damage. Does anyone have any experience with this king of problem? I would appreciate some advice whether it would be safe for them or not.

    Thanks,
    E

  18. E says:

    PS this is not the kind of ulcer that can be easily treated.

  19. E says:

    “Does anyone think perhaps that it is more that jeleousy is a very latin american trait? (knowing many latino peopel in my timew and watching them fight and try to control eachother)”

    Woah dude! I agree with you jealousy is a human emotion and not for mother earth or plants. But I’m Latin American and I think I’m way *less* jealous than average. It is common in all cultures and has nothing to do with ethnicity. If your Latino friends are like that then it’s just them.

  20. calendula says:

    I am preparing for my first Ayahuasca experience. Does anyone know if thyroid medications are a contraindication? for the last 1.5 years. I take a low dose of a natural thyroid med a natural preparation derived from porcine thyroid glands, Armour (60mg) which adjusts T3 and T4. This med has corrected the fatigue I was experiencing, I am 60 years old and in very good health.

  21. Chris says:

    I am taking a trip to the Peruvian Amazon this June for my birthday. I will be in Peru for almost a month. I would really like to participate in Ayahuasca and am well prepared to make the diet changes needed. My concern is the vaccination shots as well as the Malaria pills that will be taken for the trip. Are these going to conflict with this?

  22. M says:

    Vaccinations and malaria pills are not contraindicated with ayahuasca.

    Some people are sensitive to malaria prophylactics and don’t like how they feel on them, so if they’re traveling in an area where malaria is uncommon or rare they forgo them (that’s what I did when I was in SA). But the decision, of course, is yours, and please understand that this post id informational, and does not constitute medical advice.

  23. Chris says:

    Thank you M and of course I understand that it’s just informational. I just stumbled upon Aya when looking at one of the lodges in the amazon that offers these sessions. I’m still doing tons of reading and asking a lot of questions to see what the best way to experience this would be as well as cost.

    I’ve found a few sites so far but do any of you have any other sites or references that are a “must read” on the subject?

  24. M says:

    This site’s “sister site” — forums.ayahuasca.com — is a good source of general information on Ayahuasca. Participants include an interesting mix of traditionalists, non-traditionalists, and members of the syncretic religious faiths.

  25. John says:

    Great article and who cares about the small error… The focus here is ayahuasca, not lsd or mescaline.

  26. Leslie says:

    I am planning on participating in a ceremony very soon but I was recently (~1 month ago) prescribed Adderall 10mg/day (D-amphetamine salts). The last 10mg pill was taken 9 days prior to the date of the ceremony. (I’ve been drinking Yogi brand Detox tea for about a week, and have been following the diet & avoiding tyramine well.)

    Will I be safe discontinuing the low dose of Adderall just over a week before taking Ayahuasca?

    Reply ASAP please – very greatly appreciated
    Thank you

  27. James says:

    It would seem as though a few people got hung up on the mescaline/lsd comparison. Yes, the precursors are not the same. I’m assuming that those who chose to fixate on this trivial irrelevancy are organic chemists by trade?! Just because the precursors are not the same does not mean that they do not share the same alkaloids (chemically). Not trying to be rude, there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be factual. Just pointing out that this one “error” should not detract from the body of the article.

  28. Yvette says:

    Thank you so much for wonderful information! Ayahuasca is calling me, trying her feels like right action.

  29. BE says:

    A few friends and I will be partaking in our first Aya session very soon. We have each smoked DMT (Chonga) and are preparing to go deeper with Ayahuasca. I just have a few questions and concerns as I am not taking this decision lightly.
    Firstly, while under the effects of Aya is everyone still, for the most part, concious of what is happening around them? ie: able to vomit into a pail? or look about the room? Or will we be mostly incapacitated?
    Second, the 3 of us are relatively “new” friends (under 1 year) but are very like minded and considerate. Is there ANY possiblity our session would be “uncomfortable” due to knowing one another for such a short time?
    Lastly, we will not have any Icaros nor anyone “sober” in the room, does anyone recommend a style of music? Or even something specific to listen to during our experience for the most beneficial effects?

  30. niko says:

    All the mistakes in vocabulary and spelling errors make this difficult to take seriously.

  31. Scotty says:

    Hello my name is Scotty Enyart and I am a Ph.D. student at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  I am currently conducting research on Ayahuasca to try and further the academic worlds understanding of the healing practice and was hoping that I could get your help.  I am looking into the differences in healing between Western Psychology and the non-Western healing practice of Ayahuasca.  I would love your help. Please let me know if you have further question. And please provide me with an email address so I can send you my research questions.
     
    Your feedback is very important to bring more attention to this healing practice to the academic commuinty. 

  32. Morgan Maher says:

    Hi Scotty,

    You may find further answers and discussion regarding your inquiries here, on the ayahuasca forums.

    All the best,
    Morgan

  33. Niko Novick says:

    I know it what it says below the comment box

    Seriously, where, how?

    Even a hint would be awesome

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  35. karl says:

    I will be confident We have check this out very same type of declaration somewhere else, it should be gaining interest with all the masses.

  36. Michele says:

    Calendula, I would like to f/u with your question about thyroid medication contraindications. I to am taking nature throid since being diagnosed with Hashis. Does anyone know if this med should be discontinued prior to ceremony?
    Thanks.

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